Category Archives: Education

Schoolchildren terrorised and brainwashed by green propaganda says damning survey

Breitbart

This agenda can be found in teaching across the board – not just in obviously relevant subjects like science and geography but even in unrelated areas like French, Maths and English. It affects everything from field trips (often with an environmental theme, such as “sustainability”) to projects and film screenings (An Inconvenient Truth; The Age Of Stupid; The Day After Tomorrow) and even how well children perform in exams (with marks given automatically to children who “correctly” identify Carbon Dioxide as a major environmental threat).

The rot can be traced back at least as far as 1984, when Herbert London wrote Why are they Lying to our Children?

In his introduction, London wrote:

One evening more than a year ago I came home from university to find my elder daughter – then 13 – with tears streaming down her cheeks… When I gently inquired why she was crying, Staci said, ‘Because I don’t have a future’. [She] produced a mimeographed sheet suggesting that a dismal future – or none at all – is what awaits her…widespread famine…overpopulation…air pollution so bad everyone will wear gas masks…befouled rivers and streams…melting of the polar ice caps and world-wide devastation of coastal cities…an epidemic of cancer brought on by damage to the ozone layer…

This brainwashing became more widespread after the 1992 Rio Earth Summit, aided and abetted by useful idiots in John Major’s Conservative government such as former Environment Secretary John Selwyn Gummer (now Lord Gummer, a prominent eco-activist and investor in green technologies); then made even worse under Tony Blair’s Labour government which established a quango to advise on “sustainable” education and resulted in the study of sustainable development being made a compulsory part of teaching in geography, science, design and technology and citizenship.

It’s Time to Start Suing Schools and Officials — Personally — for Abusing Students

PJTatler

The Washington Times reports that a New Jersey school in the Vernon Schools system suspended a 13-year-old boy last Thursday. His “crime” — twirling a pencil in his fingers.

Another kid behind him yelled “He’s making gun motions, send him to juvie!” According to AWR Hawkins, that kid had been bullying Ethan Chaplin, the kid who was twirling the pencil.

And the idiots in charge of the school took the bullying to an entire new level.

The school suspended him. It ordered him to undergo both a psychological and a physiological examination. The boy’s father says his seventh-grader son was stripped and had to give blood samples and urine samples for drug testing. He passed out during the examination. Four hours after that, a social worker spoke with the boy for all of five minutes and cleared him of doing anything wrong.

When he went back to school, the principal reportedly followed him around all day.

That boy was abused by his own school. The authorities over him terrorized him. They bullied him. All just for twirling a pencil in his hand.

As has become typical in these cases, Superintendent Charles Maranzano defends the indefensible actions of those who work for him:

“We never know what’s percolating in the minds of children,” he told the news station. “And when they demonstrate behaviors that raise red flags, we must do our duty.”

Twirling a pencil is about a billion miles away from going on a murder spree.

It’s time to go Al Armendariaz on these people and make examples of them to deter this kind of abusive behavior. Our government is already doing that to citizens and has been for years. It’s time to turn the tables. The super needs to be sued personally, as does every other teacher and official involved. They’re not fit to be around children.

 

Another brilliant move in Florida

Florida: 5,000 Legal Students To Lose Their Dream

In a report released by Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) the impact of providing College Tuition Subsidy for Illegal Aliens (HB851/SB1400, a.k.a. in-state tuition) will be that approximately 5,000 legal students will be displaced in Florida higher level institutions by illegal alien students.  These legislators are unwilling to raise taxes for the additional illegal alien students by expanding capacity so legal students will consequently be displaced.

While Democrats have consistently supported college tuition subsidy for illegal aliens only recently has Republican Leadership supported the measure.  The impetus for Republicans to support the benefit seems to be a distorted belief that Governor Rick Scott’s sagging poll numbers will be bolstered.

It seems like the ones being messed over by our government, is us…

Common Core: Bad Math meets Radical Politics

Outstanding…

If you can’t get your way the first time, “appeal to emotions when making persuasive writing, to make people want something even if there’s no facts or logic for it.”

A Toothpaste Tube That Gets Every Last Bit Out

Smithsonian

all.jpg__800x450_q85_crop_upscalePannuzzo says she felt the most practical approach to solving the problem was applying the principles of origami, the ancient art of Japanese art paper folding. Though long synonymous with paper cranes and other toy craftwork, the foldaway method has also been used by designers and engineers to improve the way existing technologies like airbags and space telescopes operate. The idea is that by strategically mapping out the way a foldable object collapses, developers can make objects more compact and reduce waste.

Pannuzzo says she felt the most practical approach to solving the problem was applying the principles of origami, the ancient art of Japanese art paper folding. Though long synonymous with paper cranes and other toy craftwork, the foldaway method has also been used by designers and engineers to improve the way existing technologies like airbags and space telescopes operate. The idea is that by strategically mapping out the way a foldable object collapses, developers can make objects more compact and reduce waste.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/a-toothpaste-tube-that-gets-every-last-bit-out-180950268/#zooderrMHPs8B07O.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Pannuzzo says she felt the most practical approach to solving the problem was applying the principles of origami, the ancient art of Japanese art paper folding. Though long synonymous with paper cranes and other toy craftwork, the foldaway method has also been used by designers and engineers to improve the way existing technologies like airbags and space telescopes operate. The idea is that by strategically mapping out the way a foldable object collapses, developers can make objects more compact and reduce waste.

null

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/a-toothpaste-tube-that-gets-every-last-bit-out-180950268/#zooderrMHPs8B07O.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

An Arizona State University student’s toothpaste tube prototype forces every last bit to come out by folding down like an accordion. (Nicole Pannuzzo)

A Toothpaste Tube That Gets Every Last Bit Out

Tired of wasting leftover toothpaste, a student invents a new origami-inspired design that leaves nothing behind

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We’ve all been there: The dreaded end of the toothpaste tube. Whether you’ve tried squeezing and flattening the container into a pulp—or spent far too long devising other methods to get every penny’s worth—it doesn’t take long to realize that what consumers are stuck with is a slightly less-than-perfect mechanism for delivering that last stubborn bit of toothpaste.

It’s one of those universal predicaments people have just come to live with, mostly because the aluminum-based bottles work (for the most part) well enough. That’s also likely why toothpaste containers haven’t changed since early innovators Johnson & Johnson debuted their breakthrough collapsible tube design way back in 1898.

But Nicole Pannuzzo, a student at Arizona State University, started thinking a bit harder about this tiny flaw, and figured she could do the old toothpaste tube one better.

“Toothpaste is one product that is so classic, everybody uses, and that everyone has a small annoyance with,” she says. “I thought it would be an interesting project to take on.”

The third-year interior architecture major isn’t the first to take a stab at a solution. A quick search on Google yields a compendium of wacky do-it-yourself workarounds, ranging from simply pressing the tube against the edge of the counter to cutting it up and scaping out the remains.

But her “Colgate Redesign” project, which began as a class assignment, goes after the design of the tube itself.

Pannuzzo says she felt the most practical approach to solving the problem was applying the principles of origami, the ancient art of Japanese art paper folding. Though long synonymous with paper cranes and other toy craftwork, the foldaway method has also been used by designers and engineers to improve the way existing technologies like airbags and space telescopes operate. The idea is that by strategically mapping out the way a foldable object collapses, developers can make objects more compact and reduce waste.

null

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/a-toothpaste-tube-that-gets-every-last-bit-out-180950268/#zooderrMHPs8B07O.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

An Arizona State University student’s toothpaste tube prototype forces every last bit to come out by folding down like an accordion. (Nicole Pannuzzo)

A Toothpaste Tube That Gets Every Last Bit Out

Tired of wasting leftover toothpaste, a student invents a new origami-inspired design that leaves nothing behind

0 0 0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 1

We’ve all been there: The dreaded end of the toothpaste tube. Whether you’ve tried squeezing and flattening the container into a pulp—or spent far too long devising other methods to get every penny’s worth—it doesn’t take long to realize that what consumers are stuck with is a slightly less-than-perfect mechanism for delivering that last stubborn bit of toothpaste.

It’s one of those universal predicaments people have just come to live with, mostly because the aluminum-based bottles work (for the most part) well enough. That’s also likely why toothpaste containers haven’t changed since early innovators Johnson & Johnson debuted their breakthrough collapsible tube design way back in 1898.

But Nicole Pannuzzo, a student at Arizona State University, started thinking a bit harder about this tiny flaw, and figured she could do the old toothpaste tube one better.

“Toothpaste is one product that is so classic, everybody uses, and that everyone has a small annoyance with,” she says. “I thought it would be an interesting project to take on.”

The third-year interior architecture major isn’t the first to take a stab at a solution. A quick search on Google yields a compendium of wacky do-it-yourself workarounds, ranging from simply pressing the tube against the edge of the counter to cutting it up and scaping out the remains.

But her “Colgate Redesign” project, which began as a class assignment, goes after the design of the tube itself.

Pannuzzo says she felt the most practical approach to solving the problem was applying the principles of origami, the ancient art of Japanese art paper folding. Though long synonymous with paper cranes and other toy craftwork, the foldaway method has also been used by designers and engineers to improve the way existing technologies like airbags and space telescopes operate. The idea is that by strategically mapping out the way a foldable object collapses, developers can make objects more compact and reduce waste.

null

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/a-toothpaste-tube-that-gets-every-last-bit-out-180950268/#zooderrMHPs8B07O.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Open the floodgates? Indiana becomes first state to scrap Common Core

Push back harder!

Indiana has become the first of 45 states to opt out of the national education standard known as Common Core, and critics of the controversial K-12 program say the move could “open the floodgates” for others to follow.

Growing criticism over costs imposed by the program, as well as fears that by setting a national education standard, the program has already begun dictating curriculum, has made Common Core an increasingly polarizing issue. Although the program has both Republican and Democrat supporters, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence predicted his state will be the first of many to rethink participation.

“I believe when we reach the end of this process there are going to be many other states around the country that will take a hard look at the way Indiana has taken a step back, designed our own standards and done it in a way where we drew on educators, we drew on citizens, we drew on parents and developed standards that meet the needs of our people,” Pence said.

Waterford school districts drop federal lunch program

JournalTimes

New federal requirements that foods sold in schools be healthier have some area school districts opting out of the federal lunch program that provides subsidies for serving free or reduced-price meals to low-income students.

Opting out means the districts do not have to follow food healthiness requirements. But it also means the districts lose federal money that covers the cost of free and reduced-price meals for poorer students.

The Waterford Graded and Waterford High School districts have weighed their options and decided they’d rather forego the money and serve what they want. They’ll continue to cover the costs of low-income students’ meals — likely by spending less on fruits and vegetables that students simply throw away, and by serving slightly less healthy but overall tastier meals to increase lunch participation among paying students, officials from those districts said.

Common Core strikes again…

Middle School Workbook Reportedly Includes What Could Be the Most Outrageous Definition of the Second Amendment Yet

An Illinois father claims a workbook that teaches the Second Amendment comes with a requirement to register firearms was handed out to seventh-graders at Grant Middle School in Springfield, including his own son.

An image posted on the Illinois Gun Owners Rights Facebook page shows a worksheet that defines the Second Amendment as the following:

“This amendment states that people have the right to certain weapons, providing that they register them and they have not been in prison. The founding fathers included this amendment to prevent the United States from acting like the British who had tried to take weapons away from the colonists.”

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Say what???

Conservative prof who was denied promotion wins First Amendment lawsuit

DailyCaller

First Amendment enthusiasts are thrilled that Mike Adams, a criminology professor at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, won his lawsuit against administrators who denied him a promotion because of his conservative, Christian views.

Adams joined the university in 1993. He was an atheist at the time. By the year 2000, he had converted to Christianity and become an outspoken political conservative. He eventually wrote columns for Townhall.com.

In 2006, he was denied a promotion. Administrators were retaliating against him for his conservative views, he claimed.

The jury agreed.

Preschoolers Better At Figuring Out How Gadgets Work Than College Students

CBSNews

A recent study revealed that preschool-age children are better at figuring out how to use technological gadgets than college students.

CBS News is reporting that researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, tasked 106 children between the ages of 4 and 5 and 170 college students with figuring out how to use a gadget with which they had no prior experience.

The gadget worked by placing different clay shapes in special boxes to determine which combination would cause a box to light up and play music.

Ultimately, the younger children were reportedly much faster at figuring out the correct combination, CBS News learned.

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